fbpx

logo ×

  • PRIVACY POLICY
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Are you getting ready for an epic adventure in one of America’s most iconic national parks? Yosemite is the land of soaring waterfalls and towering granite cliffs, and Yosemite puts on a real show for April visitors.

Spring has sprung, and this season of rebirth is the perfect time to explore the breathtaking scenery of Yosemite National Park. Grab your hiking boots, pack your camera, and prepare to be amazed by the beauty of this natural wonderland.

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll take you through all the must-see sights, best hiking trails, and hidden gems that Yosemite has to offer during the month of April. Plus, we’ll share some insider tips on how to make the most of your trip, including where to stay, what to pack, and what to expect.

Important Note for 2024:  Yosemite National Park will require reservations to enter the park between on select dates, including Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays during the month of April in 2024. Fortunately, guests staying at The Redwoods In Yosemite Vacation Home Rentals, are not subject to the reservation system because all cabins are in Wawona, inside the park. If you have a valid Redwoods In Yosemite cabin reservation, simply show a copy of your booking confirmation (a screen capture is OK too), and a photo ID matching the reservation. You’ll be able to pay the entrance fee at the gate with a credit or debit card.

So, whether you’re a seasoned hiker, a nature lover, or simply seeking an escape from the hustle and bustle of daily life, Yosemite in April is the perfect destination for you. Let’s dive in and discover all the magic this incredible park has to offer!

The biggest reasons to visit Yosemite in April

Yosemite Valley

This incredible view of Yosemite Valley is one of your first glimpses of Yosemite Valley when you enter via Highway 41 from Wawona.

April Waterfalls

As the days get warmer and longer, the snow in the high country starts to melt. It flows down through small gullies and large granite basins, and then tumbles over Yosemite’s great cliffs in exuberant, rushing waterfalls. April is a remarkable time for waterfall watchers in Yosemite.

Pre-peak season

April is still a relatively quiet month in Yosemite National Park, especially if you can manage to visit during the week days. This means more of Yosemite just for you! With fewer visitors to the park, you’ll also still be able to find some excellent deals on lodging.

Low-elevation wildflowers

Purple lupines covering Wawona's meadows

Fields of gorgeous purple lupines blossom in the meadows surrounding Wawona.

Starting in April, the wildflowers in Yosemite Valley and Wawona begin to appear. The Wawona Meadow Loop is an excellent place to go looking for a wide variety of these blossoms, and if you’re lucky you’ll get to see the expansive blooms of lupine covering the meadows and roadsides with purple.

April weather in Yosemite

Orange poppies blooming in Wawona

April’s wildflower displays start a lower elevations and spread upward.

April likes to do its own thing when it comes to weather. And every April is a little different.

In an average April, the weather is shifting from the cool crisp days of winter into a more summer-like weather pattern. The average high temperatures in Yosemite Valley are a comfortable 63°F/17°C, while the average low temperature drops to 38°F/3°C. That means most people will want long pants and warmer layers for the morning and evening that you can shed when you’re in the sun mid-day.

The average precipitation in Yosemite Valley in April is 3.2 inches/81 mm. That puts us nicely halfway between the 7.0 inches/177 mm of precipitation in an average January and the negligible 0.2 in/4mm that you can expect in an average August. In real terms this means that there are a lot of beautiful sunny days in April, but it might still rain or snow occasionally. It just depends.

Of course, when you ascend or descend in the mountains, especially during these transitional spring months, you can choose your own season. Temperatures for El Portal, a small town just downhill of Yosemite Valley along Highway 140 has an average high of 72°F/22°C for the month, while in the high country of Tuolumne Meadows, it’s still a chilly average high of 45°F/7°C.

The bottom line on April weather in Yosemite is to come prepared for all kinds of weather. Dress in layers so that you can put on an extra sweater or jacket for mornings or cooler days, and then shed those layers for mid-day or warmer days.

A rain coat is a good idea. Even on sunny days, the misty blast from Yosemite’s waterfalls can be more comfortable with a good rain jacket.

Waterproof shoes or hiking boots can also be a nice-to-have if you’re planning on hiking. As the snow melts you’ll find water everywhere – running in rivulets down the trail or standing in wide puddles. If you don’t have waterproof footwear, extra socks can help keep your feet warm and dry. Or you can try adding plastic bags over your socks but inside your shoes. Your feet will sweat a lot, but they will stay warmer overall.

Finally, just before your visit, make sure you take a peek at the interactive Current Conditions map on the NPS page. It is a terrific resource for information on weather, forecasts, webcams, and water flow in different parts of the park so you’ll know what to expect.

Road Conditions and Chain Controls

A quick side note before we get to the fun stuff:

While storms grow increasingly rare in April in Yosemite, there is still a chance of snow during this month, and if that happens to overlap with your planned trip, you’ll be happy to have tire chains in your vehicle to help with traction on Yosemite’s mountain roads. Higher-elevation roads are more likely to have chain requirements, but they can be in place on any park road.

Keep your eye on the weather forecast for Yosemite in the days/week before your trip. You might want to adjust your layering systems, and see if you’re likely to need chains for your car. If there is a storm in the forecast, be sure to read up on our guide to chain requirements in Yosemite.

The Tioga Road that crosses the Sierra Nevada through Tuolumne Meadows, and the Glacier Point Road which connects Highway 41 to Glacier Point, are usually still closed due to snow in April. This is the tradeoff you make for rushing waterfalls. That high-elevation snowpack is what is turning into roaring waterfalls down low. It’s also another good reason to plan multiple trips to Yosemite during different times of the year.

Right before your trip, the best way to learn about road conditions inside Yosemite National Park is to call the road conditions hotline at 209-372-0200 (press 1 and 1 again to listen to the recording).

What to do in Yosemite in April

wildflowers blooming on the trail with a view of nevada fall

Discover gorgeous wildflower displays throughout Yosemite National Park in April, including on the trail to Nevada Fall. (Photo Nancy Robbins)

Lower elevation areas like Yosemite Valley, Hetch Hetchy or Wawona and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias are all excellent places to visit during the month of April with relatively easy accessibility. These locations provide the best of the aforementioned waterfall wandering, mountain meandering, and fun flower viewing opportunities.

Waterfall Wandering

Yosemite Valley holds many of the park’s most notorious waterfalls, and after a warm day in April, you’ll find them all flowing fast and free. You don’t even have to leave your car (though we recommend that you do) to see Bridalveil Fall or Yosemite Falls.

In April, you will probably also be treated to the elegant cascades of Sentinel Fall or the tallest single drop waterfall in the park, Ribbon Fall. Parts of the Mist Trail and the John Muir are often closed in winter, but you can hike the Winter Route to see both Vernal and Nevada Fall using the parts of both trails that remain open.

Don’t forget to visit Wawona’s waterfall while you’re here as well. The Chilnualna Fall trail starts just a few minutes from the Redwoods In Yosemite cabins, and leads up past a series of gorgeous waterfalls and cascades.

Tips for exploring snow-covered trails: Traction devices like Stabilicers or Yak-Tracks can help with footing on packed out snow on popular trails, and don’t underestimate the utility of a pair of hiking poles. The snow will be more firm (and slippery) early in the morning and late in the evening when the temperatures are cooler, and will soften during the day. That means that you may be able to walk on top of the snow in the morning, but will sink through as the day goes on, making travel more difficult.

Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequioas

Grandpa and grandson admiring the sequoias in the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias together

Just a short distance from Wawona, the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias is Yosemite’s largest and most impressive grove of sequoia trees.

There are over 500 giant sequoia trees in the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. Estimated to be thousands of years old, each is a testament to longevity and endurance. An ancient wisdom permeates the entire grove.

To get there, park at the large parking area near the south entrance gate to Yosemite National Park. If the winter has been relatively warm and dry, there could be a free shuttle service to the Arrival Area at the lower grove. If not, you can walk the Washburn Trail that starts at the far end of the parking area, or stroll up the road to get to the lower Mariposa Grove. It’s about 2 miles each way. This is more effort, but also means that you’ll have the grove more to yourself when you get there.

Beyond that you have a selection of trails to explore. Most people try to take in the Grizzly Giant Loop (2.0 miles/3.2 km) which includes named trees like the Fallen Monarch, the Bachelor and Three Graces, the Grizzly Giant and the California Tunnel Tree, but there are shorter and longer options available.

Stopping to Smell the Flowers

Each spring a wave of wildflower blossoms start in the central valley and slowly makes its way up into the mountains. By April, the fields of orange poppies have often passed their peak, and are now giving way to great swaths of purple lupines that line the roads through Wawona. The keen-eyed will also marvel at the variety of wildflowers to be found along the Wawona Meadow Loop, and scattered throughout the forest at that elevation.

Our Furred and feathered friends

As spring’s warmth spreads, you’ll also find more birds and other wildlife filling Yosemite’s landscape too. Bears awaken from a winter’s rest and begin to frequent Yosemite’s meadows looking for food. Peregrine Falcons, still listed on California’s endangered species list return to their nests and begin preparing for the next generation.

Rock Climbing

As soon as the weather warms, rock climbers return to Yosemite’s clean granite cliffs. In addition to spotting them on bold ascents of El Capitan, keep your eyes open at smaller crags as well, like the rock wall at the back of the Churchbowl Picnic area.

If you, or someone in your group, would like to try climbing Yosemite’s famous rock walls, the Yosemite Mountaineering School has a variety of classes and guided climbs to introduce climbers and would-be climbers to the area.

Don’t forget the simple pleasures too

There are also plenty of small pleasures that you can expect when taking a relaxing vacation in the mountains. Curl up in front of a roaring fire with a good book and good company. Slip out to the hot tub, or relax in the Jacuzzi. Get entirely too caught up in a board game with friends. Or hold a debate about what kind of animal might have left that strange track you found in the snow. Ultimately, these quiet activities and small moments of discovery can be among the most rejuvenating and precious.

Where to Stay

Sign to the Redwoods In Yosemite with wildflowers

Choose a vacation rental cabin from the Redwoods In Yosemite located inside Yosemite National Park in the community of Wawona.

There are many accommodation options inside Yosemite National Park, from camping to the historic luxury. However, the best option for a place to stay in April has to be a rental cabin in Wawona. Yes, of course we’re biased, but hear us out.

Naturally, it’s nice to stay inside Yosemite National Park. You’re closer to all that the park has to offer, and you can spend more of your vacation being here instead of getting here.

Unlike a hotel room, a vacation rental cabin has more of the conveniences of home. You can save money by bringing groceries with you and preparing the food you enjoy. There’s room to spread out and relax. Private homes are… well, more private. No need to worry about the noise coming from the room next door. And if the stray April storm does blow through during your visit, some homes even give you access to laundry facilities. A dryer can come in handy to dry everyone out at the end of a day of exploration. Plus, if you have fur family you can rent a vacation cabin that is pet-friendly, and bring your pup with you.

With some services, it can be hard to tell if the rental cabin that you’re looking at is inside the park or not. With The Redwoods In Yosemite, you know that you’ll be located in Wawona, close to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, and inside the park gate. Plus, The Redwoods In Yosemite makes it easy to find a place that is the perfect fit for you, with convenient filters for amenities like EV chargers, or a fireplace.

Yosemite National Park abounds in natural beauty and opportunities for adventure and discovery in a relatively safe, welcoming environment. This makes it an ideal destination for solo female travel.

Yosemite National Park has World-Famous Scenery

wildflowers blooming on the trail with a view of nevada fall

Yosemite’s most exquisite landscapes are appreciated just as well, or better, on a solo trip.
Photo: Nancy Robbins

Yosemite’s iconic landscapes are famous the world over – from the dizzying heights of cliffs like El Capitan to the roar of spring waterfalls or the unique façade of Half Dome rising up over Yosemite Valley. Soaking in the sweetness of that natural beauty is just as easy on your own as with a group, except that on a solo trip you don’t need to make any compromises. See the things you want to see and do the things that you want to do the most.

Yosemite Brims with Activities for the Solo Traveler

Carol Coyle loves solo-hiking in Yosemite National Park.

Carol Coyle has been enjoying solo hiking in Yosemite for decades. Be sure to get her best tips for making the trip special.

With more than 750 miles of trails, studded with scenic overlooks and natural wonders around every bend there is enough for a lifetime of exploration. Choose from popular trails with plenty of company or opt for the path less traveled for more alone time. The solo traveler will find herself with a wealth of choices to design the trip of her dreams.

At 83 years old, Carol Coyle has visited many different destinations, and often travels alone, especially now that her husband has passed. However, Yosemite is the spot that has captured her heart.

You’d be hard-pressed to find a Yosemite hike that Carol hasn’t enjoyed over the years. Although she visited Yosemite often with her young family back in the 70s, hiking was often her own special activity. For her, Yosemite’s trails have provided treasured alone time, a healthy distance from her to-do list, and a way to find spiritual comfort and healing. Although it’s hard to pick a favorite, some of the trails she recommends include the Four-Mile Trail and Panorama Trail. When it’s running, you can take a bus from Yosemite Valley to Glacier Point and walk back downhill to your car!

Purple flowers blooming in Wawona

Spring means gorgeous carpets of wildflowers like these lupines. Enjoy the open meadows near Wawona during your visit.

Carol also recommends the Wawona Meadow Loop as a peaceful easy trail that is located close to the vacation rental cabin that she now owns inside Yosemite in the community of Wawona.

For those looking for a little more interaction, there are plenty of opportunities for that in Yosemite too. Join a group on a free ranger-led walk to dive deep into a topic of interest. Sign up for a rock climbing lesson, guided hike, or a horseback riding tour at the Wawona Stables or Yosemite Trails in nearby Fish Camp. There are art classes for all abilities, photography walks, and so much more.

Yosemite also brims with opportunities to learn more about the park and its natural ecosystems. In addition to group activities, there are many trails like the one through the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias not far from Wawona that include interpretive signs that share the stories of these ancient and magnificent trees. Historic exhibits like the Yosemite Museum in Yosemite Valley or the Yosemite History Center in Wawona help put the park into perspective.

Where to Stay

Coyles Cabin, managed by The Redwoods In Yosemite

Carol’s home, Coyles Cabin, with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths might be a bit big for most solo travelers, but it is one of many managed by The Redwoods In Yosemite. Be sure to check out their selection of rental cabins in Yosemite for something that is the perfect fit for you.

When Carol is away, her home, Coyle’s Cabin, is managed as a vacation rental by the Redwoods In Yosemite. When Carol travels she always prefers a vacation rental. She loves having all the comforts of home, including a kitchen of her own so she can save money and prepare the foods that she enjoys most. Plus, cabins tend to be situated “closer to nature”, and she’d gladly trade a bustling lobby area for a private deck where she can easily wander outside to enjoy the sounds of nature or look up at the stars.

Carol also appreciates the fact that the Redwoods In Yosemite is based in Wawona. For a solo traveler, it’s comforting to know that the staff is just up the street if she needs anything. Because they live and work in the area, the Redwoods In Yosemite staff are also a helpful resource for current conditions and can provide an insider’s perspective on what to expect. Many repeat visitors at the Redwoods In Yosemite stop in at the front desk just to say hello and catch up on what’s new.

Safety Considerations on a Solo Trip

In addition to the reassuring presence of a local vacation rental property management staff, Carol prefers National Park destinations in general when she is traveling alone. As she puts it, there are no “bad neighborhoods” to watch out for when exploring inside a national park. So, you can feel assured that you’ll be in a neighborhood where you can feel safe.

Naturally, when traveling alone, it’s important to be aware of your surroundings and be responsible for yourself. Because it’s possible to choose more traveled or less traveled destinations to explore, in Yosemite it’s easy to find just the right level of adventure for you. Still, remember to let someone know what you’re plans are, so they know when to expect you back, and can let someone know if you haven’t returned as planned.

In her many years of exploring Yosemite, Carol has never had to call on Yosemite Search and Rescue. However, just knowing that the Yosemite Search and Rescue staff and medically trained park rangers are some of the best search and rescue outfits in the nation also provides some reassurance.

With the many things for a solo/female traveler to do and discover it’s easy to see that Yosemite National Park is one of the best destinations for getting out and discovering nature safely and on your own terms.

Written By Christina Kantzavelos

There is still time! November is a grand time to visit Yosemite National Park. Crisp mornings and cool evenings, sunny days, chromatic views, and the chance of first snow all paint your next perfect travel picture. It is the least crowded time to visit the park, which means quieter and more intimate outdoor adventures. Plus, you can catch a last glimpse of Glacier Point, Tuolumne Meadows and Mariposa Grove before they close for the season.

We’ve come up with eight reasons your visit to Yosemite should be in the few remaining weeks of November. And remember to pack layers and tire chains, just in case! 

 

1. Explore Tuolumne Meadows (before they close for the snow season!)

 

Take advantage of having access to Tuolumne Meadows/Tioga Roads before they close for the snow season. The fall really transforms each of these majestic locations into chromatic wonderlands. Plus, you get to enjoy their beautiful hikes and views in serene solitude, as neither will be as busy as in the summer. 

2. Celebrate Thanksgiving in the Park 

 

Enjoy creating a wonderful memory by hosting a Thanksgiving feast in the comfort of your cabin, surrounded by your family, and friends. Not in the mood to cook? Here are three wonderful Thanksgiving Dinner options in the park. Be sure to make a reservation! 

 

3. Visit the Grizzly Giant in Mariposa Grove

 

If you haven’t visited the newly restored Mariposa Grove, then you’re in for a treat. Hike its beautiful (and partially ADA compatible) trails before it closes for the snow season. Grizzly Giant has never looked more majestic with its colorful leaves! 

 

4. Bike in the Valley

 

Explore the valley via bicycle, and enjoy the crisp air, colorful leaves, and beautiful views as you bike by or stop to visit the less-crowded Yosemite valley staples. 

 

5. Explore the Museums in the Park

 

Don’t let November rains scare you! Is it too rainy or snowy to go exploring? Or, are you looking for a relaxing stroll? Then visit the Yosemite Museum in the valley, or walk through the Ansel Adams Gallery, which displays his work as well as other contemporary photographers and artists. If you’re in Wawona, be sure to visit the Yosemite History Center, which explains the history of Yosemite National Park and how it inspired the growth of national parks across the county and the world. 

 

6. S’mores and BBQs! 

 

Is there a more delicious food group? Gather around the fire, and enjoy roasting juicy fillets and gooey s’mores with your friends and loved ones.

 

7. Pet Friendly Yosemite Trails to Hike and Enjoy

 

Take your pup on the Chowchilla Mountain road (the original road to Yosemite), or Wawona Meadow Loop Trail in Wawona. Or, you and your canine can explore Bridalveil Fall trail, Hodgdon Meadow, Glacier Point, Cook’s Meadow Loop, or even Lower Yosemite Falls. You can also bring along your fur-baby on the Mirror Lake Trail, or take the perfect holiday card photo with them in front of Tunnel View. For both you and your pet’s safety, they are not allowed in the meadows, back country, in public buildings, or on shuttle buses. Looking for a pet friendly cabin? We have you covered

 

8. Cozy Fireplaces and Hot Tubs 

Snuggle up with a mug of delicious steaming cocoa next to the fireplace in your cabin. Or relax with a soothing cup of hot tea next in your hot tub. Not much compares to spending quality time in your cozy cabin, or hot tub, especially when it’s snowing or raining outside. 

Looking for a cabin to get cozy in for November?

Our 120 Redwoods In Yosemite cabins are located in Wawona, at the Southern entrance of Yosemite, just a few miles from the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. Relaxing and private, these fully equipped vacation cabins border the wild and scenic South Fork of The Merced River, the Wawona swinging bridge and Chilnualna Falls (the second highest vertical drop waterfalls in Yosemite)! Our Event Center includes full use of the Fireside Room and adjacent deck, with audio and visual equipment and a catering kitchen. Many of our cabins are pet friendly, some feature spa tubs, and all have private decks with BBQ’s and upgraded linens for that, “Home Away from Home” experience. Relax, explore, escape!

More Resources

Before your visit, take a peek at the interactive Current Conditions map on the NPS page. It is a terrific resource for information on weather, forecasts, webcams, and water flow in different parts of the park so you’ll have a sense of what to expect during your visit. For current road conditions the best and most up-to-date information call the hotline at 209-372-0200 (press 1 and 1 again) to listen to the recording.

Are you thinking about visiting Yosemite National Park in September? You’re in luck! September is an ideal time to explore the park. In September, Yosemite combines the vast array of activities available during the summer months with comfortable cooler temperatures – perfect for hiking and other outdoor activities.

Important Note for 2024:  Yosemite National Park will require reservations to enter the park between on select dates, including Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays (September 2) during the month of September. Fortunately, guests staying at The Redwoods In Yosemite Vacation Home Rentals, are not subject to the reservation system because all cabins are in Wawona, inside the park. If you have a valid Redwoods In Yosemite cabin reservation, simply show a copy of your booking confirmation (a screen capture is OK too), and a photo ID matching the reservation. You’ll be able to pay the entrance fee at the gate with a credit or debit card.

Keep reading for a deep dive into everything that Yosemite has to offer, and what to expect during a September visit.

Weather in September

Family taking a horse-drawn stagecoach ride at the Yosemite HIstory Center

It’s easy to imagine early Yosemite park visitors bumping down dirt roads on the way to visiting Yosemite after taking a horse-drawn stagecoach ride at the Yosemite History Center.

Choose Your Own Temperatures

There isn’t just one answer to what to expect for temperatures in September in Yosemite.

Because Yosemite spans sun-soaked foothill climates at 1,800 feet (549 m) to craggy alpine summits at 13,114 feet (3,997 m), you can find a range of temperatures in the park on any given day. This allows you to choose your own temperatures by choosing activities at lower or higher elevations.

If you’re exploring Yosemite Valley or Wawona, you’ll be at around 4000 feet (1,220 m). The average high temperature for September in Yosemite Valley or Wawona is 83℉ (28℃) and the lows are 51℉ (11℃) on average.

However, if there’s a heat wave during your visit, or you prefer cooler temps, consider visiting Tuolumne Meadows. At 8,600 ft (2,622 m), the high temps average a very comfortable 65℉ (18℃) while evenings drop to a brisk 32℉ (0℃).

Looking for something in between? Try hikes along Glacier Point Road that are around 7000 ft (2,134 m)

Precipitation in September

September is still comfortably within Yosemite’s “dry season”. However, we will occasionally see some afternoon thunderstorms that tend to build over the high country in Tuolumne and can spill down into the lower elevations as well.

Because September tends to be dry, there is also a possibility of smoke and fire throughout California between late June and the beginning of the wet season – usually in mid- or late-October. It’s a price we pay for so much glorious sunshine.

Before your visit, check the interactive Current Conditions map on the NPS page. It is a terrific resource for information on weather, forecasts, webcams, and air quality in different parts of the park so you’ll have a better sense of what to expect.

What to Pack to Wear in Yosemite in September

Fall view of Half Dome in Yosemite Valley

You may have noticed that Yosemite’s temperatures fluctuate a lot between day and night. Plus, since you’ll probably want to explore several different areas within Yosemite National Park, it’s important to arrive with a variety of layers of clothing.

This layering strategy allows you to start with a puffy jacket in the morning. Pull off that jacket and enjoy long sleeves as the day starts to warm up, and then shed even that layer to be comfortable in short sleeves for mid-day.

We recommend carrying a light rain jacket too. It can double as a wind-breaker, and adds a lot of warmth for the amount of space it takes in your pack. Plus, if you are treated to an afternoon thunderstorm, you’ll be glad you have it with you.

Similarly, you might want to trade a warm wool beanie for early morning outings for a sun hat later in the day.

Hiking or trail running shoes with good traction are ideal for walking Yosemite’s sometimes-polished granite.

September is often still warm enough to enjoy a refreshing swim in one of Yosemite’s rivers or lakes. If that sounds like the perfect end to a day of hiking and exploration, be sure to grab a suit and towel too.

How Busy is Yosemite in September?

By September, Yosemite National Park feels calmer, especially mid-week. Schools are back in session, so there are fewer families traveling. There are still plenty of people visiting, but it’s like the park has taken a nice deep breath.

Weekends are busier than weekdays. If you have flexibility in your travel plans, be sure to take advantage of quieter mid-week days in Yosemite.

Yosemite National Park Service has started a text messaging service with information about when parking fills in various parts of the park. We’d recommend signing up for that a few weeks before you plan to visit so you can get an idea of what areas fill (and which do not) and at what times. That will give you a rough sense of when you should plan to arrive in different locations.

Sign up for current traffic conditions by texting YNPTRAFFIC to 333111.

Where to Stay in Yosemite in September

Cabins at the Redwoods In Yosemite

Escape to a cabin in Yosemite. You’ll find a great selection (and deals) at The Redwoods In Yosemite.

While Yosemite’s visitation is past-peak in September, we still recommend booking your lodging reservations early to get the best selection. Yosemite Valley lodging in particular can fill far in advance.

Check out booking a vacation rental cabin in Wawona instead. The Redwoods In Yosemite has the largest collection of cabins inside the park and plenty of filters that make finding the perfect place, and don’t forget to check out the special offers to get the best deal.

Best Hikes in Yosemite in September

September is a hiker’s paradise in Yosemite. The high country trails are open with many options for walking to an alpine lake or past soaring cliffs. Water flow has receded as the high-country snow melted away, so the waterfalls will be smaller (or gone) but you will be more likely to keep your feet dry by crossing on stones over small creeks rather than having to wade.

Mist Trail/John Muir Trail

Vernal Falls and The Mist TrailYosemite Valley lies at the heart of the national park, and there are many trail options ranging from short wheelchair and stroller-friendly walks through Cooks Meadow, to the steep trails that climb up from Yosemite Valley floor that provide birds-eye views.

However, with two big waterfalls that run year-round, the Mist Trail is the best, most popular, and most-scenic hike any time of year, and particularly in September. The trail is steep, but there are so many jaw-dropping destinations along the way it’s easy to customize to the hiking ability of your group. Whether you turn around at the Vernal Fall footbridge after getting that view of Vernal Fall (1.6 miles/2.6 km round-trip), the top of Vernal Fall (2.4 mi/3.9 km round trip) or make it all the way to the top of Nevada Fall (5.4 mi/ 8.7 km round trip), you’ll be in for a real treat.

Take the free shuttle in Yosemite Valley to Happy Isles (Shuttle Stop #16) or walk the extra 1.5 miles round trip from Curry Village.

Taft Point / Sentinel Dome

The trailhead for these two destinations starts at the same spot along Glacier Point Road. You can either do them one at a time or combine them into a longer loop with stunning views looking down into Yosemite Valley.

Taft Point is known for its striking fissures and the dizzying view from the guard rail down into the valley. Sentinel Dome provides an impressive 360 view of Yosemite’s high country as well as looking across at Half Dome and down into Yosemite Valley.

As separate hikes, each destination is 2.2 miles/ 3.5 km round trip with mostly rolling terrain – although the final climb to the top of Sentinel Dome is quite steep – take your time and enjoy the scenery.

As a loop, expect about 5 miles/ 8 km. The section of trail connecting the two destinations follows the valley rim and is a less-traveled treat.

As long as you’re driving out along Glacier Point Road, don’t forget to stop at Glacier Point too. It’s a particularly good destination for sunset.

Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias – Grizzly Giant Loop

The Mariposa Grove is the largest of the three giant sequoia groves in Yosemite National Park and is located close to Wawona and the South Entrance Gate. A stroll among these ancient giants is always worth the time, especially if you haven’t had the chance to see a giant sequoia before.

In September, most people will park near the South Entrance and take the free shuttle bus to the Arrival Area at the Lower Grove, though you can also walk the Washburn Trail (2 miles/3.2 km) if you want to stretch your legs.

From there, the most popular hike is the Grizzly Giant Loop (2.0 mi/ 3.2 km round trip) which takes you past the Fallen Monarch, Bachelor and Three Graces, and up to the Grizzly Giant (one of the largest trees in the grove). Just past the Grizzly Giant, you can walk through a living sequoia, the California Tunnel Tree.

However, you could also simply follow the wheelchair-friendly boardwalks around the Big Trees Loop (0.3 mi/0.4 km) for a shorter walk. For more time among the giants, hike the Mariposa Grove Trail plus Guardians Loop (7 mi/ 11.3 km round trip) to take in the (quieter) Upper Grove trees as well.

Cathedral Lakes Trail

Like Yosemite Valley, it’s hard to choose just one best hike in the Tuolumne region, but the Cathedral Lakes Trail is certainly a strong candidate. On this trail, you combine the serene beauty of Lower Cathedral Lake with the striking summits of Cathedral, Echo, and Tressider Peaks rising all around. The round-trip is 7-8 mi (11.2-12.8 km) depending on whether you want to see Lower Cathedral Lake, Upper Cathedral Lake, or both of them.

What to Do in Yosemite in September

Yosemite’s hiking is spectacular, but September offers much more than just hiking. If you’re ready to give your legs a break check out some of these other options.

Come join us for the biggest Yosemite Clean Up event of the year with Yosemite Facelift!

All participants should register and you can do so here: https://www.yosemiteclimbing.org/yosemitefacelift2023

There are great prizes (including a chance to win a two night stay at The Redwoods), fun activities, and above all, one great goal of collecting as much trash as we possibly can! Event begins September 20, 2023 through September 24, 2023.  Please register before September 11, 2023!!!! 

Horseback Riding

Swing into the saddle for a horseback riding experience. Ride a Quarter Horse with family-owned and operated Yosemite Trails, or take a 2-hour ride along the Wawona Meadow Loop at the Wawona Stables.

Museums and the Yosemite History Center

Wawona’s Yosemite History Center takes you back in time to the era of horse-drawn wagons. A collection of historically significant buildings from around the park sheds light into a part of Yosemite’s history.

Stop by the Wawona Visitor Center at Hill’s Studio to see an exhibit of paintings by Yosemite artist Thomas Hill, and chat with friendly rangers there.

Biking

Mountain bike in the snow

There are many options for biking in the Yosemite area. Photo: Yuli Gotsev

Biking is a fun way to see Yosemite Valley. Plus, mountain bikers will love the nearby trails in the Sierra National Forest.

Fishing

Cast a line into one of Yosemite’s creeks, rivers or lakes. The region around Wawona is known for brookies, browns, and rainbows. The guides at Yosemite Sierra Fly Fisher have all the details.

Ride a Historic Steam Train

Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad

Take a ride on a historic steam train at Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad!

Get a chance to climb aboard an authentic steam train at Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad. They have 1-hour tours during the day or spend a magical 3-hour evening that includes dinner, a train ride, and live music around the campfire.

Junior Ranger / Ranger Programs

Learn more about what you’re seeing in Yosemite from one of the park rangers. The Junior Ranger program is appropriate for children and appreciated by people of all ages as a way to experience the park more deeply. See the Yosemite Guide to learn what programs are happening during your stay.

Sightseeing / Wildlife Viewing in Yosemite

So much of Yosemite’s beauty can be appreciated from roadside stops. Take a scenic tour up toward Glacier Point or out along Tioga Road as well as through Yosemite Valley.

Be sure to keep your speed down and your eyes open for some of Yosemite’s magnificent wildlife as you go. If you’re lucky, you may see one of Yosemite’s black bears (they can be brown or even blonde), mule deer, bobcats, coyotes, and so many more.

Photography

It may be hard to take a bad picture in this amazing place, but if you’re interested in coming away with the best photos possible, also consider joining The Ansel Adams Gallery for one of their photography walks.

Fall foliage in Yosemite Valley and Wawona usually peaks in mid-October, but keep your eyes open for small pops of color starting in September.

Rock Climbing

Go Climb a Rock. Yosemite is world-famous for amazing rock climbing. You’ll love the unique experiences and views from high atop Yosemite’s cliffs. Yosemite Mountaineering School offers beginner classes all the way up to multi-day ascents of El Capitan, and the Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides can introduce you to climbing just south of the park.

Swimming

Friends enjoying the river on innertubes near Wawona

There is a splashing good time to be had on the rivers in Wawona.

The days are still warm enough in September to enjoy a refreshing swim in Yosemite’s rivers or lakes. Wawona is particularly known for its delightful swimming holes. You might also enjoy swimming in the Merced River in Yosemite Valley or the sandy beach at Tenaya Lake along Tioga Road.

Go Stargazing

There’s nothing quite like finding a quiet spot away from the bright lights of the city to appreciate the beauty of the night sky. In September, you might even see a shooting star. The September Epsilon Perseids (not to be confused with the August Perseids from the Swift-Tuttle comet) add an extra spark of celestial excitement to the experience.

More Things to Do in Yosemite

This is a long list, but there are even more things to do in Yosemite. It’s truly a destination with something for everyone.

See You in Yosemite in September!

It’s easy to see that September in Yosemite is an idyllic time to explore the park in more ways than one. We hope to see you soon!

When you visit Yosemite in August, you find the park at its peak season. Everything is open so you’ll find the biggest selection for shopping, dining, and activities. Families are enjoying the last bit of summer travel time before school starts again with plenty of hiking options as well as refreshing trips to local swimming holes.

Important Note for 2024:  Yosemite National Park will require reservations to enter the park between on select dates, including August 1-15, and Saturdays and Sundays during the remainder of the month in 2024. Fortunately, guests staying at The Redwoods In Yosemite Vacation Home Rentals, are not subject to the reservation system because all cabins are in Wawona, inside the park. If you have a valid Redwoods In Yosemite cabin reservation, simply show a copy of your booking confirmation (a screen capture is OK too), and a photo ID matching the reservation. You’ll be able to pay the entrance fee at the gate with a credit or debit card.

Pro tip: If you can, take advantage of the lull in late August. Because schools start earlier than they used to, kids often end up back in school by the middle of the month. Meanwhile, those without children often wait until after Labor Day to plan their fall trips, leaving a quiet period at the end of August when you can enjoy summer conditions with fewer people around. In fact, starting in mid-August you will also often find better discounts on Yosemite lodging.

August Weather in Yosemite

Kid on an intertube in the river

Wawona is well-known for its refreshing, and not too crowded swimming holes.

In Yosemite, August is the warmest and sunniest month of the year. High temperatures in Wawona or Yosemite Valley are often around 89°F (32°C), but mornings and evenings are cooler, averaging a delightful 57°F (14°C), perfect for hiking or other active pursuits. And when the sun is at its highest, delightful swimming holes with refreshingly cool waters invite wading, swimming, or floating.

Another popular option is to travel to higher elevations in the summer for hiking or exploration. For example, at 8,000 feet (2,622 m), in Tuolumne Meadows, the average high temperature is only 70°F (21°C). Just be sure you bring some warm layers if you want to visit the high country early or stay late because evening temperatures average just 37°F (3°C).

The month of August also has the lowest precipitation of any month, with only 0.2 inches (4 mm) of rain on average, making beautiful cloudless blue skies the August norm. The downside of California’s warm and dry August weather is the possibility for wildfire. Fire is a natural and essential part of this region’s ecosystem, but it can lead to smoky conditions if there are large fires in the area.

Before your visit, take a peek at the interactive Current Conditions map on the NPS page. It is a terrific resource for information on weather, forecasts, webcams, and air quality in different parts of the park so you’ll know what to expect.

What Clothes to Pack for Yosemite in August

With such a big temperature range, it can be hard to decide what to pack without bringing the entire closet. The first step is to figure out where you plan to spend the most time, and then bring a variety of layers that can be added or shed depending on the day’s conditions. For example, wearing a tank top plus sun shirt plus sweater plus a puffy jacket can provide plenty of warmth for cool mornings at altitude, and you can slowly shed those layers as the day warms up. If you plan to sleep in, explore Wawona or Yosemite Valley, and then retire to your cabin for a relaxing dinner, you won’t need as many warm layers. But if you’re planning to stay up until late for astrophotography or a stargazing program, you’ll be grateful for some extra clothes.

Because the sun is so powerful in the Sierra Nevada, many people find that clothing that provides shade can be as cool or cooler than a t-shirt or tank top. Consider a wide-brimmed sun hat or a lightweight, light-colored, long sleeve sun shirt to stay cool and protect yourself from the sun’s powerful UV rays.

And don’t forget a swimming suit to take the plunge at one of Wawona’s popular swim spots.

Things to Do in Yosemite in August

You won’t lack things to do in Yosemite in August. This is the height of the summer season, so whether you’re planning to hike through the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, enjoy a horseback riding trip with Yosemite Trails, or gaze up at the starry skies with a park naturalist, you’ll find plenty of memorable activities for your visit. Here are a few highlighted suggestions to make the most of your August visit.

Hiking in August

Grandfather and boy admire Giant Sequoias together

A stroll through the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias is an absolute must for your Yosemite Visit. Photo: Nancy Robbins

With warmer temperatures, it’s time to think about high-elevation and shadier hikes. In Yosemite Valley, trails that face north, like the Four Mile Trail, will tend to be cooler than the Upper Yosemite Fall trail which faces south and can become a giant solar oven – amazing in January, but less welcome in August. The water in Yosemite Fall is usually minimal by this time of year anyway. The Mist Trail is a good selection because it’s in a relatively cool canyon, and the waterfalls along this trail flow year-round. The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias tends to have excellent shade from surrounding trees, so that is another good option.

Choosing hikes at higher elevations can also make a big difference in terms of temperature. Hikes along the Glacier Point Road (when it re-opens in 2023) or over in the Tuolumne Meadows area are significantly cooler than those that start at lower elevations.

An alternative strategy for finding cooler hiking conditions is to start hiking early when it is still fairly cool out and then plan more relaxed activities during the warmer part of the day. Spend the middle part of the day with a siesta in your cabin, relaxing by the water, or simply find a shady spot for a picnic. Then you can rally for more hiking as the day cools off again in the evening.

By choosing a local trail, like the one to Wawona’s Swinging Bridge, you can combine some trail time with a refreshing dip in the river.

Stargazing

Easily reached from the Bay Area, Fresno and Los Angeles alike, Yosemite and the surrounding area is the perfect getaway.  A place to distance yourself from the crowds, from the noise, and from the city lights.  Whether you’re hiking solo on a backcountry trail, or parked with the family on a turnout along one of Mariposa County’s many country roads, whether you’re using the naked eye, a pair of trusty binoculars, or that brand new telescope, the night sky seems to go on forever prompting visitors to scan the heavens, take a deep breath of fresh air and announce…wow, I’ve never seen so many stars.

For this month’s meteor showers, one can visit this calendar, and for all other astronomic opportunities, there is a great source of information on Yosemite.com.

In August, it is not uncommon to spot amateur astronomers setting up telescopes at Glacier Point on Saturdays. The Yosemite Conservancy offers a few Stargazing events in Yosemite Valley as well, and we highly recommend them!

Biking

When you’re ready to give your hiking boots a break, consider exploring Yosemite Valley by bicycle. There are two bike rental stands – one at Curry Village and another at Yosemite Valley Lodge – that rent cruiser bikes for commuting around the valley. Pedal Forward bikes in Oakhurst also rents mountain bikes (and bike racks) if you’re more excited about descents and single-track options in the Sierra National Forest.

Ranger-led Programs and Guided Activities

Rangers and other guides offer many opportunities to learn about Yosemite from local experts. There is everything from art classes, to astronomy programs, rock climbing lessons, train rides, horseback riding and so much more.

Consult the Yosemite Guide for more information on ranger-led programs during your stay, and see this list of things to do near Wawona for even more ideas close to the Redwoods In Yosemite cabins.

Connect with Yosemite’s History

The Yosemite History Center, located right in Wawona, offers a tour of significant historic structures in Yosemite. These buildings tell the story of settlers, artists, and laborers that have helped make Yosemite what it is now.

Chat with Yosemite rangers, and peek into the studio of a locally famous 19th-century artist at the Thomas Hill studio. This small building close to Wawona Hotel is now part visitor center and part free museum.

Hop aboard a historic steam train at Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad and then pan for gold, and visit their museum.

The Yosemite Museum in Yosemite Valley is another wonderful history-filled stop. Displays illustrate the cultural history of the Miwok and Paiute people from 1850 until now. Discover what they used to eat, see demonstrations of basket weaving, beadwork, and learn about traditional games. Be sure to wander through a reconstructed village behind the museum to see some of the plants that they used, and the buildings they used to live in.

Staying at the Redwoods In Yosemite in August

When you’re planning your August trip, be sure to consider getting a vacation rental cabin reservation in Wawona with The Redwoods In Yosemite. Wawona’s location inside the park gates makes it easy to explore the park. And the convenient filters on the Redwoods In Yosemite site make it easy to find just the home you’re looking for, plus you’ll save money by booking direct.

Spring in Yosemite, what it is like?

The snow has melted in nearly all of the lower elevation places, the rivers and streams are rushing, the baby animals are strolling, the flowers are in full bloom, and the mountains are calling. What better way to see the natural beauty of Yosemite than by taking a hike during this exciting time? Whether you are looking for a short and sweet hike through the meadow, along the river, or crave a more strenuous hike to visit a raging waterfall, Wawona has you covered.

 

  1. Wawona Swinging Bridge Trail 

 

The Wawona Swinging Bridge Trail is a short and mostly flat .75 miles (1.2. km) round-trip hike to the swinging bridge which takes you across the scenic and wild South Fork of the Merced River. It’s beautiful, serene, and the bridge does truly swing. In addition to enjoying the wildflowers, in summer, you can also swim in the river down below, which is not nearly as busy as other water holes and beach spots in Yosemite Valley for example. While you’re in the area, don’t forget to also check out the Pioneer History Center for fun Yosemite history. 

 

  1. Wawona Meadow Loop

 

The Wawona Meadow Loop is a relatively flat 3.5 (5.6 km) loop trail that starts at the Big Trees Lodge. Formerly known as the Wawona Hotel, this is one of California’s oldest hotels that has been operating since 1879. This is the only bike and leashed pet-friendly trail in the area, so bring Fido along. It’s also home to various wildflower species, and now is the perfect time to see them! 

 

  1. Chilnualna Falls 

 

This is a strenuous 8.2 mile (13.1 km) hike, with an elevation gain of 2,400 feet (732 m) that leads you to one of the tallest waterfalls in the park via a series of switchbacks. It begins two miles from the Chilnualna Falls Road, in the Chilnualna Falls parking area. This hike is made up of three cascades, including some smaller ones at the bottom. It’s not heavily trafficked, so you will likely get most of it to yourself. You get bonus points in the summer for dipping in some of the secluded swim holes along this trail. 

     4. Mariposa Grove Hikes

Mariposa Grove has finally opened for the season! This area is home to wonderful trails winding through some of the world’s oldest trees, including the 1,800-year-old Grizzly Giant. Keep in mind that visitors must park in the south entrance, which is two miles away from the grove. The shuttle busses pick up visitors every 10-20 minutes. Visitors with disability placards can drive to the Grizzly Giant parking area rather than take the shuttle in. Here are a few great hikes within Mariposa Grove:

 

This is a very short and easy 0.3 miles (0.4 km) loop trail, that is wheelchair accessible, leading you to the Fallen Monarch tree. 

This is a 2 mile (3.2 km) mile loop trail that’s rated as moderate, with a 300 (91m) elevation gain. In addition to the Grizzly, you will pass other famous trees in the lower grove like the Fallen Monarch, Bachelor, Three Graces, and the California Tunnel Tree. 

This is a 6.5 mile (10.5 km) strenuous loop trail, with an elevation gain of 1000 ft (305 m). In addition to passing by Grizzly Giant Loop trees, the trail passes by some notable spots in the upper grove like the  Telescope Tree, the fallen Wawona Tunnel Tree and the Mariposa Grove Cabin. 

This is another somewhat strenuous hike that’s 7.0 miles (11.3 km) in total, with an elevation gain of 1,200 feet (366 m). In addition to the Grizzly Giant Loop trees, you pass by portions of the upper grove, including famous sequoias like Three Graces, the Gaintful Coupole, the Bachelor and the Clothespin Tree. This also leads you to the historic Wawona Point (6,800 ft.)  that has a beautiful overlook with a panoramic view. 

Looking for a cabin near the hikes? Check out our Current Specials!

All of our 120 Redwoods In Yosemite cabins are located in historic Wawona, near the South Entrance of Yosemite National Park, just a few miles from the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. Relaxing and private, these fully equipped vacation homes border the wild and scenic South Fork of The Merced River, the Wawona swinging bridge and Chilnualna Falls (the second highest vertical drop waterfalls in Yosemite)! Our Event Center includes full use of the Fireside Room and adjacent deck, with audio and visual equipment and a catering kitchen. Many of our cabins are pet friendly, some feature spa tubs, and all have private decks with BBQ’s and upgraded linens for that, “Home Away from Home” experience. Come on up! Relax. Explore. Escape!

Text credit: Christina Kantzavelos, BuenQamino

The Redwoods In Yosemite News Release

Release Date: February 25, 2021
Contact: info@redwoodsinyosemite.com

Media:    yuli@redwoodsinyosemite.com

 

The Redwoods In Yosemite Vacation Home Rentals, Wedding and Event Center Reopen on March 1, 2021

 

Wawona, CA – We are excited to confirm that beginning March 1, 2021, visitors of Yosemite National Park will be able to stay in our vacation home rental accommodations at The Redwoods In Yosemite.

Yosemite National Park day-use reservations are no longer required for all park visitors and Redwoods guests, including annual and senior pass holders.

As usual you can make a cabin or vacation home reservation online at www.redwoodsinyosemite.com and for Covid-19 related health and safety information, please visit: https://redwoodsinyosemite.com/blog/covid-19-measures-and-precautions-at-the-redwoods-in-yosemite/

Our wedding and event center is resuming operations as well and you can find out more about the current wedding/group size requirements by calling our Events Coordinator at 877-496-3052.

Please be mindful of ongoing infrastructure related construction in the area. There will be utility and tree removing crews working in Wawona for the next few weeks and more, so please be alert and drive with caution. If your stay with us is heavily dependent on a solid internet connection, we advise to contact our Reservations team at 888-225-6666 before booking your vacation home. As of now, our homes and main building show low to mediocre bandwidth internet/data speeds.

For the most up-to-date current conditions in Yosemite National Park, please visit https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/conditions.htm.

Have a safe trip and we look forward to re-connecting with you all!